Friday night calls for ZOOM

Zoom art

About ten years ago, two close friends began having dinner on Friday nights with a woman they knew that was going through a divorce. Her husband was bipolar and the marriage had dissolved over the stress of trying to hold things together. She was also dealing with children spreading their wings at the same time, so there was plenty to talk about.

My late wife and I joined their little group, and Friday nights were spent mostly at a Mexican restaurant called El Mocajete. It was a small place without room for parties of more than four or five at best. But it was our place, and it served the purpose.

Eventually, our woman friend moved out to Colorado after some dating adventures that included meeting a winemaker famous for his inexpensive reds and whites. She turned him down for a date, but somehow that gave her a sense of independence and liberation and she moved out to Colorado.

Once she moved on, other folks were invited to join the Friday night club. It grew organically from there, mostly with members of our church, which was also going through some growing pains. So there was plenty to talk about along with family, work and other changes familiar to the fifty-plus set.

Working through loss

A few years into the Friday night social club my wife passed away. She’d been through eight years of treatment and surgeries from ovarian cancer. Together we’d received much help along the way from the people in the Friday night club, especially one woman that was the preschool director where my late wife taught four-year-olds. So it was a strange thing to meet those first few Fridays after her passing. So many conversations had taken place over the years.

We’d all been through those struggles together, and several of my Friday friends encouraged me to date. Before long I met a woman that I really enjoyed through a dating site called FitnessSingles.com. The Friday night group liked her company and the months and years started to roll past. Four years into our relationship, we got married. Through it all, we met most Fridays with an alternating group of regulars that at times totaled fifteen people. We’d squeeze tables together at whatever restaurant we chose and talk with whoever sat closest to us. Sometimes we’d catch the eye of someone down the table and wink and wave. It was accepted that not everyone would get to talk each week.

Stay-At-Home

When the Coronavirus Stay-At-Home order came through in Illinois, our Friday night group adapted like so many other social connections in the country. We jumped on Zoom. The call was ably coordinated by the original organizer of the Friday night club. That fellow and his wife have been friends of mine since college. We’ve even served as godparents to each other’s children and have helped each other through some harrowing stuff over those forty-plus years, included auto crashes and bicycle crashes, heart attacks and family crises of all kinds. But all along, there has been joy as well.

In fact, there’s a foundational feel to the Friday night group as a whole. Thus our Friday night Zoom calls are not strained affairs. In some ways, other than talking over each other on occasion, the calls have transcended even the conversation capabilities of the weekly restaurant meetups. We’ve had amusing moments given the varied technical capabilities of our collective users as people play with the views on Zoom. Somehow a friend outside the group even had a call in which her mother’s image was upside down. Yet even our typical on-screen facial expressions and body language call for a new awareness. It seems the whole world is learning these things together during this pandemic.

Dining and defining local

But all of us agree that being safe is important to ourselves and everyone else. So there’s no selfish whining about why we have to Zoom rather than dine out. We’ve each been catering food from local restaurants to support them. That’s the first round of conversation: “What’s everyone having tonight?”

Then we open up the forum to what’s happening in life. We’ve gotten laptop tours of new flooring and baby chats with a prior and new grandchild. Cats and dogs have made appearances, as have daughters and sons living with parents during this odd moment in history. On that front, it’s interesting to hear what the kids think of our inevitably overhead, often loud, filled-with-laughter conversations blaring throughout the house.

Nothing’s perfect

Nothing in life is perfect. Thinking back over the time covered by the Friday night group makes me realize some of the mistakes I’ve made on the work front, the family front and life in general. Yet there have been joys and successes as well. All we can really hope to do is ask forgiveness for the dumb or thoughtless stuff we might have done and appreciate those who share this multifaceted journey we call life.

After all, it all goes by like zoom. And then it’s over. So it’s much wiser to live fully in the moment, hope for the best, plan for the worst and work to make things better the best way you can. That’s the right kind of pride.

 

Christopher Cudworth is author of the book The Right Kind of Pride: Character, Caregiving and Communityon Amazon.com. 

 

 

 

3 thoughts on “Friday night calls for ZOOM”

  1. Nice Chris. Thanks for sharing your musings.

    I was going to post about this but didn’t get around to it. Last Friday was the 50th anniversary of the first performance by the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, the chorus Carl and I sing in that supports anything choral done by the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Boston Pops. We were supposed to be having a big celebratory concert of course to mark the occasion but obviously that, and all concerts through the early summer so far have been canceled.

    Ironically, Friday was also the second anniversary of the death of the much beloved founder of that chorus. So someone initiated a zoom call to raise a toast and reminisce with only a couple days notice. As it turns out about 80 chicklet windows on three pages attended (many of which had two singers, such as our home).

    While everyone at some point had to be within a couple hours of Boston or Tanglewood to effectively participate in the chorus, people move and this call was open to alumni. So as it turns out, we had people in Buenos Aires, Switzerland, England, California and NYC. At least three people were recovering from the virus. But what struck me most was a reflection of that tagline we keep hearing – we’re all in this together. It didn’t matter where people were, for the most part, we were all experiencing the same thing to various degrees – the lockdowns, the grocery stores, the work at home, the crazy kids, the physical absence of friends and family. How often can that be said? Just an observation…

    Carey

    Carey Erdman

    President, Erdman Design Inc.

    617.816.6467

    carey@erdman-design.com

    Carey Erdman

    President, Erdman Design Inc.

    617.816.6467

    carey@erdman-design.com

    ________________________________

    Like

  2. Nice Chris. Thanks for sharing your musings.

    I was going to post about this but didn’t get around to it. Last Friday was the 50th anniversary of the first performance by the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, the chorus Carl and I sing in that supports anything choral done by the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Boston Pops. We were supposed to be having a big celebratory concert of course to mark the occasion but obviously that, and all concerts through the early summer so far have been canceled.

    Ironically, Friday was also the second anniversary of the death of the much beloved founder of that chorus. So someone initiated a zoom call to raise a toast and reminisce with only a couple days notice. As it turns out about 80 chicklet windows on three pages attended (many of which had two singers, such as our home).

    While everyone at some point had to be within a couple hours of Boston or Tanglewood to effectively participate in the chorus, people move and this call was open to alumni. So as it turns out, we had people in Buenos Aires, Switzerland, England, California and NYC. At least three people were recovering from the virus. But what struck me most was a reflection of that tagline we keep hearing – we’re all in this together. It didn’t matter where people were, for the most part, we were all experiencing the same thing to various degrees – the lockdowns, the grocery stores, the work at home, the crazy kids, the physical absence of friends and family. How often can that be said? Just an observation…

    Carey

    Carey Erdman

    President, Erdman Design Inc.

    617.816.6467

    carey@erdman-design.com

    ________________________________

    Like

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